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just getting a paycheck, you really don't understand how government can affect that firsthand. that was one of the things that led me to think this is a useful idea for a book. >> overall, philosophically, how do you see the role of government, the role of congress, the role of the president in the economy? >> basically this book raises and answers the question. we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and create jobs. when government battles too much in the economy, its policies are driven by politics and markets are driven by individuals and the real world music people. that's the difference between what government does about markets do. you need government to protect us from fraud, from wrongdoers. there are wrongdoers the government can protect us from them. overly meddlesome government goes to fire and you end up suppressing enterprise and innovation and job creation. >> 2008 financial situation and the so-called bailout. are you supportive of that government intervention? >> release the question and answer of the book basically. you ca
government will conduct a national test of the emergency alert system. >> you cannot avoid it. it is everywhere. john: does it make you feel safe the government spent 40 years studying the assault assault -- soap. do we need government to protect workers? >> absolutely. next? -- question. [laughter] >> good intentions and gone wrong. that is the show. tonight. john: politicians claimed they make life better to pass laws. they have good intentions but we should not judge by intention. politicians good intentions go wrong. work regulation. companies are not greedy they don't care about their workers but seems reasonable government has to protect them. almost everybody agrees. >> they should be protected. >> definitely. so many things could have been. corporations could be corrupt. the government should step been. john: that makes sense. so much beyond the workers' control. safety rules. what does a factory owner care? that is why we need occupational safety and health administration. it sets safety rules. they will show how the workplace deaths dropped since the beginning. thank
award and the great government consulting as they pick the products to bring a lot of innovation to san francisco. cory? give cory a round of applause. [applause] >> thank you, chris. thank you so much for all of your hard work, chris. none of this could be possible without your efforts. good evening. the good government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding di
met by private groups or government, voluntary action or government action. the truth is, there has to be a balance between the two. government must ask for the common good while leaving private groups free to do the work only they can do. there is a vast middle ground between the government and the individual. our families and our neighborhoods. the groups we joined and the places of worship. this is where we live our lives. this is where the needs of each are most clearly recognized and met. our communities shape our character and give our lives direction. they help make us a self-governing people. the campaign of 2012 is filled with a lot of moments i will always remember. one of my favorites is the day bob talked about. it was to meet with people in cleveland, ohio. bobble brought them together. his center for neighborhood enterprise empowers communities. ryan's story will always stay with me. when he and his wife felt called to open a homeless shelterit is not enough to give food and shelter. people needed spiritual development. people need assistance to get on with their life.
governments and now someone is calling to create a nation lottery to pay down the debt. if washington is not coming up with new ideas why not debate it i am cheryl casone and welcome to cash in . we have johnathon and tacey and john . jill joining us. wayne we'll start with you. is it time for a national lottery to pay down the federal debt same time. >> a question why not. if it works with the state governments. why not the federal government and me it a big and huge one and any little niche that you can knock down the deficit is good. >> okay, but john, what happens to the states. we are finding out that california is signing up for powerball because of the revenues that they get. is it bad for states. >> it is really bad for states. wayne has much chance of winning the lottery as geth throh a comment without johnathon interrupting. >> zero. >> and the problem you have with this. this could be a biion dollar jack mots and huge and going to kill the state lottos and in the stouthe states. they were sold as a way of funding education . that didn't happen. they are dependent on the gen
are we now? 9:00 p.m. sunday. fox news. relive the dream. dream again. >> the federal government will conduct a national test of the emergency alert system. >> you cannot avoid it. it is everywhere. john: does it make you feel safe the government spent 40 years studying the assault assault -- soap. do we need government to protect workers? >> absolutely. next? -- question. [laughter] >> good intentions and gone wrong. that is the show. tonight. john: politicians claimed they make life better to pass laws. they have good intentions but we should not judge by intention. politicians good intentions go wrong. work regulation. companies are not greedy they don't care about their workers but seems reasonable government has to protect them. almost everybody agrees. >> they should be protected. >> definitely. so many things could have been. corporations could be corrupt. the government should step been. john: that makes sense. so much beyond the workers' control. safety rules. what does a factory owner care? that is why we need occupational safety and health administration. it sets safet
feel safe that the government has spent 40 years running this? are your savings safer because of these two congressmen. >> do we need government to protect workers? >> absolutely. next question. [ laughter ] >> but one result is this. government's good intentions went wrong. that so our show tonight. tonight. john: politicians claimed they make life better to pass laws. they have good intentions but we should not judge by intention. politicians good intentions go wrong. work regulation. companies are not greedy they don't care about their workers but seems reasonable government has to protect them. almost everybody agrees. >> they should be protected. >> definitely. so many things could have been. corporations could be corrupt. the government should step been. john: that makes sense. so much beyond the workers' control. safety rules. what does a factory owner care? that is why we need occupational safety and health administration. it sets safety rules. they will show how the workplace deaths dropped since the beginning. thank goodness for government. except look at this graph.
to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to keep on pushing data sets that
ways and very creative ways. and i want to say, again, as someone who has worked in government for 23 years, i've been at those departments like dpw and others where we think in one dimension. this is where we clean the streets. this is how often we clean it. this is when we tell the cars to move off. and this is what dpw does and it does it pretty well within that constraint. if you shared that data with companies who are looking at where do people live, how -- what their patterns are, we can get a lot more creative. when we open our data, when we suggest to departments that they can work in collaboration, when we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that
are the weaknesses to measuring how the government is doing in terms of being transparent? >> i agree that the strides being made in electronic folia - foia publication should go faster. the question i get all the time is why hasn't the white house engaged with congress on legislation to make federal spending more transparent. they have been -- the co mpttroller of the united states, the tech industry, and 23 open government groups saying we need legislation because federal spending data is not as trends. as it needs to be. information and should be published is not being published. why has the white house sent a deputy treasury secretary to capitol hill to testify against the legislation? the answer lies in the fact that making valuable data published in standardized always requires engagement with a substantive policy area. the opposition to be data at in the white house is being driven by the office of federal management. it is not that office's job to make sure things are published. i do not believe the white house leaders' working on open government data oppose what we -- white h
.s. government. it looks just like 1/4. it was only made 79-81 for three years. it was the last regular issued government issued coin they made the san francisco mint uncirculated condition with the proof. it had all kinds of problems. it makes it a commercial failure but makes it a collectable absolutesaffordable at $129 and a customer pick but $109.95 the most affordablen set released by the u.s. government of all the coin sets we have. the 1999 season the anthony. most people do not even know that coin exists. it was not in the proofset and not man said. that coin you gotta individually--mint- set coin! these, $79 apiece.are $109 across the board for everything that you see. >>host: explain where you get numbers. >>guest: i talked about getting individually and the reason is pretty simple. people buy coins individually to build their sets. when i say if purchased individually that is the way most people put their coins together. the coin catalog they are the lord largest coin catalogers kind of the gold standard and has always been there. that is the reference point for retail coin p
priority and they have the full support of her majesty's government and the brilliant words they do. >> this is helping tax my own party headquarters and my own party members. i thank the executive to get to that. a recent attack on party colleagues and offices and constituency offices and staff threatened intimidation from loyalists, and if confirmed, all threats of political motivated violence will be triggered by republican attacks. >> discussing this for mr. david this morning, if it is unacceptable, all that staff were intimidated in any way comment and i know that the justice minister and i will continue to defend the ability of politicians in northern ireland to carry out their duties. >> questions for the prime minister? dr. julian lewis, number one, mr. speaker. >> before i answer my hon. friend's question i am sure the house will wish to join me in thanking the duke and duchess of cambridge on the wonderful news they are expecting their first child, the perfect piece of news to end and in court a -- extraordinary jubilee year. joining the question on afghanistan veteran gl
of this government, geronimo. and carol says sandra on the cover of time magazine, but it more own a gun. was it could? to like this? that is our show tonight. [applause] >> and now john stossel. john: food can kill. people will eat the wrong stuff may get sick. it's while most everyone says we need government toet some limits. make sure there is not bacteria in your food or dangerous chemicals. to make sure food companies tell you what is in their food and how fattening it is. state legislator felix ortiz ha done that in new york city. he got trans fat man, calorie counts posted at mcdonald's and other fast-food places now he wants a ban on adding too much salt. so ou think he saved lives? >> absolutely. john: okay. a farmer. he grows vegetables dollar raises cows, chickens, and pigs. i assume you want the people who buy your beef and pork to be safe. so don't we owe him a vote of thanks for saving this? >> no. i would say you're killing me out here. trying to get my stuff to market. this plethora of government regulations, you know, is killing our farm and our ability to come to rket.
will eat the wrong stuff may get sick. it's while most everyone says we need government to set some limits. make sure there is not bacteria in your food or dangerous chemicals. to make sure food companies tell you what is in their food and how fattening it is. state legislator felix ortiz has done that in new york city. he got trans fat man, calorie counts posted at mcdonald's and other fast-food places. now he wants a ban on adding too much salt. so you think he saved lives? >> absolutely. john: okay. a farmer. he grows vegetables dollar raises cows, chickens, and pigs. i assume you want the people who buy your beef and pork to be safe. so don't we owe him a vote of thanks for saving this? >> no. i would say you're killing me out here. trying to get my stuff to market. this plethora of government regulations, you know, is killing our farm and our ability to come to market. john: you are just a greedy businessman and don't care if people died. let's go through some of the ways that assemblyman ortiz has saved the chance that band. >> that is old news. john: you wann a tax on junk food. >>
eat the wrong stuff may get sick. that's why most everyone says we need government to set some limits. make sure there isn't bacteria in your food or dangerous chemicals and to make sure food companies tell you what's in their food and how fattening it is. state legislator felix ortiz has done that in new york city. he got trans-fats banned. calorie counts posted at mcdonald's and other fast food places. now he wants a ban on adding too much salt. do you think you have saved lives? >> absolutely. >> well, joel is a farmer, grows vegetables vegetables vegetables and raise cows, chickens and pigs. joe, assume you want people to buy your beef and pork to be safe. don't we owe him a vote of thanks for saving us? >> no, i would say you're killing me out here. i'm trying to get my stuff to market and this plethora of government regulations is killing our farm and our ability to come to market. >> you're just a greedy businessman and you don't care if people die. let's go through some of the ways that assemblyman ortiz has saved us. the trans-fat ban. >> that's old news. how about you want a
more efficient government, along with some very good entrepreneurial efforts that are reflected in today's announcements and some of our partners that are here today. so, three years later, after announcing this and after doing the first generation of open data legislation, open sf is still a very vigorous, and we want to do even more. we've teamed up again with board president david chiu who has been personally involved with this and helping us and guide us with his knowledge, having been a small business owner himself, with how we can do even better. and today we are announcing actually two areas of improvements to our piece of legislation that i think will get people even more excited. the first is after a couple of years of opening up some of the data streams in our city and seeing how this data had already started, some companies, some entrepreneurs develop applications, helped us already with identifying some additional needs in the city and involving more people, we want to do even more along that line. and, so, this legislation will allow us to establish, along with the
million americans receivinglet benefit, is it because government officials are constantly promoting it i am dave asbin. go in focus with victoria and rich and rick and john and, john why are food stamps going up if unemploymt is going down. >> the unemployment rate is high and that obcures a people who left the work force altogether that are not counted. as for politicians encouraging that, that is a horrifying notion . the idea of going on food stamps is something that should be s painful we only go on them a bef time so there is an incenti to go back if the work force. >> rick, you have all of the s and iear four of them every hour and government volunteers specifically going out to encourage people to get food stamps . there is it a big push to get people on food stamps. >> i don't think it is it promoting the food stamps but getting informatio to pple who need them so they know they are there to get the i think there is a lot taking place thate need to recognize. we have surprisingly good news on unemployment. there will be i lag for that anditching off food stamps d get back to work
of these are entrepreneurs who are not seeking special government leaders. the big banks, the goldman sachs of the world were all internet government and the government itself is mandating the purchase of these credit defaults on its and other devices which ended up bringing down the economy. it's not procapitalist to support goldman sachs and the internment embrace of the department of the treasury. >> is supply-side economics is quick >> surprise side economics is true economics. i actually am quite excited to have mitt romney running for president because they & co. was one of the providers of the foundation of supply-side economics. they apply to business. they showed the most effective way for businesses to gain share -- market share to cut their prices. we will cut prices that their business market share because costs are out by about 20 to 30% with each doubling of total units that were sold. the cost in general, economies of scope and scale of learning is called a learning curve. this is really the foundation of supply-side economics. why when you cut taxes, which are just like a prize, you reduce co
. government domination of education prevents new opportunities from being seen. private system it benefits kids that are -- it is a whole field of education that is not developed because of government. john, that is the systemic limit and that's why quality of education went down and cost went up. (talking all at once.) >> something happened in the past 20 years it can be done with the public. >> coming up everyone. we'll go for longer school days and shorter work days for government employees and making them work 40 hours a week like most of the us do would save taxpayers over a mill -- billion a year. ♪ rade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's anothereason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >> coming up a costly new plan to extepped school day
government and freep enterprise movement and connect those policies. >> why has there been a failure to connect? >> i'm not sure there is one reason for it and i haven't had time to think about it why it has happened but it needs to happen. the principles we stand for, free enterprise and limited government is the only way to stabilize and grow our middle class which i hope every american can attain. >> how worried are you about the republican chances -- >> you mean from the voters' perspective. the demographic changes? i don't think any voter in america -- there are voters that are locked into one party or the other but the fastest growing group is people who vote for candidates and not parties and people understand the issues and hopes that they have and offer real and concrete policy situations and real role for government to play in addressing those angst yits they face. we are one election away to do it. we have to recognize what it is and concentrate on doing it. >> how much of a danger to republicans do you think is posed by the changing demographic? >> it's not a danger but i
and taxing, we're too focused on the tax. bottom line, the government takes it out of the system cutting and raising taxes and the small or deficit. that means that people are going to be out of work, almost by definition in the short run. but in the long run it's a healthier economy that doesn't go down the path of greece. if the long run greece would have low unemployment, but they do not, but yes, we're going to go a percent, if it happens the worse case scenario, but in five years we won't be not able to borrow money. >> brenda: julian, you can go ahead and respond. >> first of all, the ernst & young study has been debunked over and over. and number two, the bush tax cuts, if you let the bush tax cuts. the crs study was a republican study and found the same thing as the cbo. if you let bush tax cuts expire on everybody, yes, you would have negative economic impact. the two staetudies done recentl shows the top two rates, top 2%, virtually no impact. to jonas' point if you raise taxes a the lot and cut spending a lot and so austerity plan, that would have an impact. democrats were for
john: you look forward to going to school? >> yes. twenty-seven regular government schools get results because they are a government monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more p
need the government to set limits make sure there's no bacteria in your food or dangerous chemicals to make sure food companies tell you what is in the food and how fattening it is. felix ortiz has done that in new york city. he got calorie counts posted at mcdonald and other fast food places. now he wants a ban on adding too much salt. so representative ortiz you think you have saved lives because of these things? >> absolutely. >> joe is a farmer he grows vegetables also raises cows, chickens and pigs. i assume you want the people who buy your beef and pork to be safe. don't we owe him a vote of thanks for saving us? >> no actually. i would say you are killing me out here. um prying to get my food to market and this plethora of government regulations is killing our farm and the ability to come to market. >> you are a greedy businessman don't care if people die. let's see ow lives saved because of the ban on trans fat? that is old news. how about you want a tax on junk food. >> we have it built to make sure many money so that the carbohydrate products in the market. we are giving t
think the federal government will be on each of the following issues. we read a list of these issues, we rotated those. this is how it basically stacks up. ensuring long-term future of entire programs such as social security and medicare, 65%. 64% creating jobs, 64% improving public education, growing the economy, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done in the past, or do you think these are unique set of challenges that are so serious that we might not be able to overcome those challenges? two-thirds of voters, 67%, say we will be able to do that. 31% have concerns about it. look at the bars across the bottom. the ones like younger voters, 18-29, confident we'll get
the government is doing that shouldn't be doing. >> that is right. marks a smart guy and i agree with him. the spending issue, we simply cannot rein in while we are focusing on taxes. you shall howl nonserious the president is. he sent timothy geithner on a fools errand. he said he wants a balanced approach. buthe balance is that republicans come up with everything, and he is allowed kharkov on the debt limit. it is hard to understand what the balances of the equation, besides allowing him to retain his approach, which is continuing to spend and rack up massive deficits and continuing higher taxes without any plan that bears that out. remember that his budget hikes taxes and still spends $47 trillion over the next 10 years. gerri: to that point, you look at the approval rating now going down for the first time since the election at 49%. i think it tells you something. maybe american people are looking at this and it looks a whole lot like campaigning to me. it is like the election never happen. we are still campaigning on the campaign trail. today in pennsylvania, talking about what needs
russian government is making it a requirement for tankers that follow that route to use russian ice breakers. it's not only natural gas, the japanese are looking to other energy sources to replace nuclear power after last year's nuclear disaster. an exhibition featuring the latest using solar powered technology has begun near tokyo. about 200 companies are taking part from japan, china and germany and several other countries. demand is growing in japan has power companies are now required to purchase renewable energy. but japanese solar makers lag behind overseas competitors in terms of profitability. this is one of the exhibitors. the japanese company is displaying solar panels with the world's highest level of power efficiency. it's trying to make a profit by selling solar panels as well as the electricity it generates. sharp is exhibiting a new product which is a combination of window glass and a solar battery. although it can be used on homes and office windows, it can generate only half the power of a regular solar panel. >>> more people in japan are planning to travel during t
and regulation. but government encroaches everyday on people who want to start schools. john: the blob in charge they don't that competition state education department even the best states we have an of the highest performing traders goals and arizona the director spends 30% of the time filling out paperwork they tried to squeeze her school into a box. she has to report on the improvement plan. for what? john: i tried to make sure the kids are protected. >> but did her case are all kids reading at grade level? in no. math? no. qualified founders who have recognized something they want to do and we say don't come and? it is a movement people tried to get away from. >> i have resisted undid the union's teachers showed up shame on you. then they demanded i try teaching. >> you can teach for one week. john: the crowd like to the idea. so why surprise them to say sure. i was ready. but the blob did its thing and would not let that have been after endless meetings they decided i should not teach for one week like they embraced the soviet bureaucracy they don't care about the kids? >> i cannot imagine
, and the government is fully committed to making that happen. >> [inaudible] pruitt. >> the prime minister obviously believes within the leveson report, there exists something that is bonkers. how would the prime minister give the views of his planning minister who has said tens of thousands of new homes will have to be built on greenfield sites. >> i think it is absolutely clear, yes, we should build on brownfield land, yes, we should try and deal with the problem of empty homes, but we do have to have a conversation about the need to build more flats and more houses, where we don't have the current situation we have where if you don't have the help of mom and dad, people are in their mid 30s. all credit to the planning minister for trying to fix this problem. on the issue of leveson, i actually think there's a wide degree of agreement about what a new regulatory system ought to look like. it's set out there in black and white in leveson. we need to challenge the press to introduce it and, if they don't, obviously, we have to take further action. >> with more men in work than ever before, with more
involved in government service for over 40 years, i count my time in the army intelligence. it is close to 50 penc. having worked in various areas in congress and the executive branch, doing what we do here is not easy. so often part of what you do with, the challenges thank you have to work together. you have to be able to work together. sometimes it is not that easy. when it came to the joint effort here, in the military itself, i feel we have developed joint news as a real strength of our military. they're not even close to the level of joyousness we have in this country. it is working. it is doing well. my biggest challenge is going to be how can we take this model to make sure we can develop similar approaches elsewhere between military and veterans' hospitals paying able to come together, at being able to operate as one incident having these huge backlogs because they're trying to move someone from the military into the veterans operation and it becomes a huge pain in the ass to get it done. if we can bring that together so we are operating as one with the ability to really respon
settlements. >> the german government comes under fire for the alleged plan to sell tanks to saudi arabia's authoritarian rulers. >> happy birthday, sms. it is the 20th anniversary of the text message. >> israeli ambassadors have been summoned to various european capitals to face criticism over israel's plans to build homes in the west bank. the u.s. also slammed the mood as -- move as "especially damaging." >> israel's prime minister remains especially defiant. they announce the plans to build homes on friday in response to the plan to upgrade palestine to a non-member state. in the israeli ambassador -- >> israeli ambassador daniel taub. paris and berlin called in israeli envoys to express their opposition. they say that israel is sending an negative message in the midst of national -- international peace efforts. >> israel is undermining competency -- confidence. >> israel says it will build 3000 settler homes in eastern jerusalem and the west bank. also plans to accelerate construction in the area known as e1. that would further isolate palestinians in east jerusalem from the rest of
quotes a government official as saying the fueling of the rocket could begin on saturday after the storage tank has been filled. chinese travel agencies have been informed that foreign tourists won't be allowed into north korea between the 15th and 20th of this month. analysts say the decision could be linked to events marking the first anniversary of kim jong-il's death on december 17th. >>> in japan, government leaders have ordered self-defense forces to be prepared to shoot down any debris from the rocket. the defense minister passed on that order to sdf commanders. >> translator: the day of the rocket launch, we ordered the sdf to intercept any debris from a north korean rocket. we're preparing in accordance with that order. >> it will fly southwest of okinawa's island. they're deploying surface to air missiles throughout the region. prime minister yoshihiko noda held a national security meeting with his ministers. he approved the order for the sdf to mobilize their missile defense systems and shoot down any debris. this will be the third such order issued by the government
>> i believe government is here to fix our streets, roads, and protect us, but they don't need to protect people from their jobs. >> three cheers for her. you at home who understand it's freedom, not central planning that gives us better lives, that's our show. thanks for watching, i'm john stossel. ♪ >> eric: watch the 5 nt week. >> the 5 p.m. or the show? thank for joining us. >> see you tomorrow. >> brenda: just as the unemployment rate is dropping, isapitol hill signaling tax heights are coming? add up the signs. a key conseative leaving the senate for the private sector epublicans reportedly cook up a doomsday plan that would give the president the tax hikes he wants. so if taxes goup, will jobs go down? hi, everyone, i'm brenda buttner, this is bulls and bears, let's get right to it. here they are, the bulls and bears this week. we've got gary b smith, tobin smith. and julian epstein, welcome to everybody. todd, if taxes go up, get ready for that unemployment rate to shoots u, too. >> you've got that right. brenda, not only going to go higher, we're looking at hundreds
not raise the adequate amount of wheat that he wanted to. because the government had decided they were going to control wheat plantings. and so what he said was, okay, then i can raise wheat for my chickens. and he took it all the way to the supreme court and lost that battle. >> host: why do you recount that story in "the debt bomb"? >> guest: because it's a great example on the enumerated powers and the unwinding -- why do we find ourself in the place we're in now? how'd we get here, what do by -- we do about it, and what are the ramifications? the greatest way for the government to make something expensive is for the government to make it affordable. and all you have to do is look at the programs. what were the average inflationary costs of health care before we created medicare and medicaid? they ran the same as every other aspect of our inflation. in other words, there was no differential between health care costs. now that we have a government program, what has happened is health care costs are two, sometimes three times the rate of the average inflation in the economy. so what you did
his first four years increase the size of our federal government spending by 25 percent, and now he's asking for more stimulus money. unfettered control. this really is a hostage situation, and this is not what the american people need. we have 25 million americans looking for jobs, searching for jobs. we don't need to add additional taxes. gerri: covers woman, look. the american public is going to blame your party, the republicans, some 53 percent say of the fiscal cliff happens, every fall over the edge republicans are to blame. how do you square that? is a year on the right side, trying to do things. yet the public certainly does not see your effort. >> i think one of the things that is so difficult for me is that the media cannot not talking about you in particular. the general media has fallen into this rabbit hole of only talking about this one issue. if we were to give the president what he wants, the panacea. that is the pitfall of our problems. it only funds government for eight days. how can we be serious about staying focused on one thing in not talking about all the othe
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